Black History Through Archival Images: Part 2

Flickr Commons’ Curated Albums

Too many images of underrepresented people and groups go unidentified in archival collections. For Black History Month in the United States we’re showcasing some of our curated collections which tell the stories of Black experiences.

State Archives of North Carolina – Charlotte Hawkins Brown

Charlotte Hawkins Brown was an educator and civil rights activist who opened the Palmer Institute for Black students in Sedalia North Carolina in 1902.

N_83_12_9CHBrwn-c1930-GOOD

The Palmer Institute was the only accredited rural high school (for African American or white students) in Guilford County NC. It graduated generations of Black educators; Brown worked there herself until she retired in 1952.

N-83-12-7PalmerInst1933

The State Archives also have a set of sixty archival images of North Carolinian women from the 1800s through the 1950s.

PC2177_B1_F1_B

pc2154_V9_P90

Other notable collections include this set of photographs of Black soldiers from North Carolina who fought in World War I and a collection of Raleigh’s lost African American architectural landmarks (as well as some that are still around).

N_2009_4_162 371st Infantry Band 1917

N_53_17_119 Shaw Hall

 

San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives – African Americans in Aviation

From the Tuskeegee Airmen to Mae Jemison, the San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives collects photographs and other ephemera, some of it from personal scrapbooks, documenting Black people working in aviation and aerospace.

Tuskegee

Benjamin Davis, specifically had a long military career, retiring in 1998 as a four-star general.

Ben O Davis and P-51

Leroy Criss, another of the Tuskegee Airmen, kept a scrapbook where many of these images are from.

Criss 050-1

Mae Jemison

Willa Brown was the first Black woman to earn a pilot’s license in the United States.

 

Willa Brown

While we’re on the subject of space, NASA also has created a collection of Black astronauts and other people who worked in aerospace.

Winston Scott during EVA

Col. Frederick D. Gregory

 

National Library of Medicine – African American Medical Practitioners

The NLM has curated a collection of Black workers, mostly women, in the Public Health Service for their History of Medicine division.

Nurses standing with bicycles

Teeth cleaning

Improvised clinic

Mennonite Church USA – Camp Ebenezer Photographs, 1947-1950

Tillie Yoder Nauraine founded an early “fresh air” camp in Ohio for poor Black  children from Chicago. This was part of the Mennonite movement towards “building an interracial church in a segregated society.” Yoder opened the camp out of her conviction that “all people are equal in God’s eyes.”

 

Camp Ebenezer:  Boys Playing Baseball

Camp Ebenezer:  The First Ebenezer Campers

Camp Ebenezer: African American Children on Teeter-Totters

Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation Cornell University – Civil Rights

The International Ladies Garment Workers Union actively worked for the rights of Black workers in including picketing Woolworths and making a New York to Washington DC Prayer pilgrimage to mark the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision that segregated schools are unconstitutional.

People picket against the Woolworth Company's practice of segregation, April 20, 1963.

Prayer pilgrimage attendees holding an ILGWU sign in front of their bus

The Kheel Center also has documentation of the Southern Tenants Farmers Union, an integrated union which held meetings in Parkin Arkansas in 1937.

Smiling STFU members at an outdoor meeting

Image verso: "An early union meeting." Black and White STFU members including Myrtle Lawrence and Ben Lawrence, listen to Norman Thomas speak outside Parkin, Arkansas on September 12, 1937. One man carries an enamel pot and drinking glass.

Large group sharing a meal at outdoor banquet tables during an STFU meeting

Black men listening to a speaker at an outdoor STFU meeting

If you’d like to see more archival photography (or other material) about Black history and culture, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division at New York Public Library owns over 300,000 images, thousands of which are online and over a thousand of which are in the public domain.

Or if you’re interested in modern Black photographers read this GQ article where twenty-five Black photographers discuss what drives their work or this Guardian article showcasing the best photography by Black female photographers or this blog post at Flickr.com spotlighting the work of photographer Ayesha Kazim.

 

Black History Through Archival Images: Part 2

Flickr Commons’ Curated Albums

Too many images of underrepresented people and groups go unidentified in archival collections. For Black History Month in the United States we’re showcasing some of our curated collections which tell the stories of Black experiences.

State Archives of North Carolina – Charlotte Hawkins Brown

Charlotte Hawkins Brown was an educator and civil rights activist who opened the Palmer Institute for Black students in Sedalia North Carolina in 1902.

N_83_12_9CHBrwn-c1930-GOOD

The Palmer Institute was the only accredited rural high school (for African American or white students) in Guilford County NC. It graduated generations of Black educators; Brown worked there herself until she retired in 1952.

N-83-12-7PalmerInst1933

The State Archives also have a set of sixty archival images of North Carolinian women from the 1800s through the 1950s.

PC2177_B1_F1_B

pc2154_V9_P90

Other notable collections include this set of photographs of Black soldiers from North Carolina who fought in World War I and a collection of Raleigh’s lost African American architectural landmarks (as well as some that are still around).

N_2009_4_162 371st Infantry Band 1917

N_53_17_119 Shaw Hall

 

San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives – African Americans in Aviation

From the Tuskeegee Airmen to Mae Jemison, the San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives collects photographs and other ephemera, some of it from personal scrapbooks, documenting Black people working in aviation and aerospace.

Tuskegee

Benjamin Davis, specifically had a long military career, retiring in 1998 as a four-star general.

Ben O Davis and P-51

Leroy Criss, another of the Tuskegee Airmen, kept a scrapbook where many of these images are from.

Criss 050-1

Mae Jemison

Willa Brown was the first Black woman to earn a pilot’s license in the United States.

 

Willa Brown

While we’re on the subject of space, NASA also has created a collection of Black astronauts and other people who worked in aerospace.

Winston Scott during EVA

Col. Frederick D. Gregory

 

National Library of Medicine – African American Medical Practitioners

The NLM has curated a collection of Black workers, mostly women, in the Public Health Service for their History of Medicine division.

Nurses standing with bicycles

Teeth cleaning

Improvised clinic

Mennonite Church USA – Camp Ebenezer Photographs, 1947-1950

Tillie Yoder Nauraine founded an early “fresh air” camp in Ohio for poor Black  children from Chicago. This was part of the Mennonite movement towards “building an interracial church in a segregated society.” Yoder opened the camp out of her conviction that “all people are equal in God’s eyes.”

 

Camp Ebenezer:  Boys Playing Baseball

Camp Ebenezer:  The First Ebenezer Campers

Camp Ebenezer: African American Children on Teeter-Totters

Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation Cornell University – Civil Rights

The International Ladies Garment Workers Union actively worked for the rights of Black workers in including picketing Woolworths and making a New York to Washington DC Prayer pilgrimage to mark the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision that segregated schools are unconstitutional.

People picket against the Woolworth Company's practice of segregation, April 20, 1963.

Prayer pilgrimage attendees holding an ILGWU sign in front of their bus

The Kheel Center also has documentation of the Southern Tenants Farmers Union, an integrated union which held meetings in Parkin Arkansas in 1937.

Smiling STFU members at an outdoor meeting

Image verso: "An early union meeting." Black and White STFU members including Myrtle Lawrence and Ben Lawrence, listen to Norman Thomas speak outside Parkin, Arkansas on September 12, 1937. One man carries an enamel pot and drinking glass.

Large group sharing a meal at outdoor banquet tables during an STFU meeting

Black men listening to a speaker at an outdoor STFU meeting

If you’d like to see more archival photography (or other material) about Black history and culture, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division at New York Public Library owns over 300,000 images, thousands of which are online and over a thousand of which are in the public domain.

Or if you’re interested in modern Black photographers read this GQ article where twenty-five Black photographers discuss what drives their work or this Guardian article showcasing the best photography by Black female photographers or this blog post at Flickr.com spotlighting the work of photographer Ayesha Kazim.

 

Our plan for 2024: Flickr Commons & Data Lifeboat & the 100-year Plan

Find out more about our nefarious schemes for the coming year…

 

When I do planning, I usually carve it up along three axes: Projects, Pipeline, and People. I want to keep our project list very short in 2024. That allows us to focus more deeply, I think, and spend time thinking and waxing and wandering a bit as we map the new terrain of our mission, to keep Flickr images visible for 100 years.

Projects

There are three main flows of project work for the team:

  1. Flickr Commons nurturing and growing
  2. Start Data Lifeboat
  3. Continue 100-year plan ideation and workshopping

Flickr Commons

Flickr Commons turned 16 years old last week. To celebrate, we launched the first instantiation of a new front door which lives at commons.flickr.org. The intent is to help Commons fans explore the different members’ collections more easily, and get a sense of recent activity across the aggregate. We hope to do another handful of releases over this year and beyond.

The other good news is that we’re nearly, finally, ready to welcome new members into the program. The software that supported new registrations and members had decayed a bit over the last decade, so, working with the company team—thanks Ruppel et al—we’ve co-designed a new set of Commons-specific APIs that will help the Foundation really lean into supporting Flickr Commons members from now on.

We are going to build: 1) a new registration form, 2) improved onboarding resources/workflow, 3) the new discovery layer you can now see at commons.flickr.org, and 4) better admin tools for the team to watch over the health of the program, and the happiness of our members. This will all be rolling out in the first half of this year. I don’t have a date for our first new tranche of members, but rest assured, we’ll let you know!

Later in the year, we want to find out a lot more about Flickr members interact with Flickr Commons and see if we can support them to more easily keep track of their input and progress. If you fit into this group, we’d like to know you!

Data Lifeboat

Last year, we applied to the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to develop a first set of prototyping for our Data Lifeboat concept. That’s the idea that we should actually plan for a possible end of flickr.com, developing “lifeboats” that can carry Flickr photos to other places if the big ship goes down. It was gratifying that the NEH decided to support this first block of work.

Our framing for the grant is to create two identical lifeboats containing Flickr pictures, “objective metadata” like EXIF, and a first crack at “social metadata”—the stuff that is only created on Flickr—because we think that’s essential for longer term contextual, archival framing of the existence of a Flickr photo. After all, on Flickr (and off) a photo is a social object, that is discussed, arranged, annotated, pointed at, and displayed, and EXIF data (the data that is created when a digital camera takes a photograph) falls short.

We’re planning to post NEH-grant-specific updates the blog at the end of each month, so stay tuned for that. (I’d better write that next!)

The 100-year plan

I don’t have a structure or plan written yet. But, I’ve really enjoyed all the discussions I’ve had about the idea, and especially the various workshops we’ve run in different groups about the idea. Basically, the workshop is called How to write a 100-year plan and my opening gambit is “I don’t know, what do you think” and conversation ensues.

We do hope to be able to at least get that workshop into a form where you might be able to run it without us. We’d let you know about that too.

Pipeline

We’re just over one year old, launching officially in November 2022. We’ve had an amazing start, thanks to support from SmugMug and our first cornerstone funder, Filecoin Foundation for the Decentralized Web. Since then, we’ve figured out how to accept donations of cash online via Stripe, and even stock donations! We’ve sketched out the grants we’re planning to apply for too.

People

Ewa Spohn, who also helped write the NEH grant for Data Lifeboat, has joined the crew to manage the project. With a background in mechanical engineering, program management, and people-arranging, we’re lucky to have her! Welcome, Ewa!

We’ve brought on a new part-time team member to help wrangle our Pipeline work, Susan Mernit. (Check out her sledgehammer!!) A veteran of the tech industry, Susan changed gears to lead two non-profits in California, to great success. She’s now working with nonprofits to help shore up their development plans and strategy, and we’re very glad she’s come on board to support us.

And, in case you missed it, we’re hiring: Our first job ad for this year is Archivist. It’s live now, closing January 31st.

Sixteen years of Flickr Commons

Today is a big day for Flickr Commons – it’s our 16th birthday! 🎉 🎂

Since January 2008, the Flickr Commons has been a place for cultural heritage organizations to share their unique historical photography collections with a global community of people interested in visual culture, and see how Flickr volunteer researchers can add knowledge and new descriptions to them.

Flickr Commons has grown to include over 100 members in 24 countries, amassing roughly 1.5 million pictures on flickr.com over the past 16 years. And from today you can now delve into all of the organizations who’ve contributed to this vast historical resource in our new, dedicated Flickr Commons Explorer! Not only can you see which organizations take part in the Commons, but also the scale and scope of their collections. Have a look around and let us know how it can be more useful to you!

We’re celebrating in other ways too:

🎈For one day only, we’re taking over Flickr’s Explore page with photos from the Commons (with thanks to Josie and Crystal in the .com team)

Celebrating Flickr Commons 16th birthday with an Explore takeover!

🖼️ We’re featuring the stories of sixteen less well-known gems from the Flickr Commons collection

And no birthday is complete without looking back at the year that’s passed and the year ahead.

A woman blowing out the candles on her birthday cake
U.S. Marine wife Marge Brown blowing out the candles on her birthday cake, from State Archives of North Carolina.

2023: Spotlight on Flickr Commons

We’ve been working hard to breathe new life into the Flickr Commons program after a quiet period.

  • We welcomed Jessamyn West to the Flickr Foundation to look after the Flickr Commons as our Community Manager.
  • Alex Chan joined us as our Tech Lead. They’re building all the new tools to help Flickr Commons partners see inside their Commons collections and measure their impact.
  • We opened a ‘new front door’ for Flickr Commons, a way of exploring all of the Commons members in one place – have a look around!

(This is a screenshot showing you our four newest members, from the Flickr Commons Explorer.)

2024: Growing the Commons community

This year we’re continuing to reconnect with existing Commons members as well as opening the doors to new ones. We’re chuffed to share that we have our first new members coming online very soon: Community Archives of Belleville and Hastings County (Ontario, Canada); State Archives of North Carolina (USA); and Port Morien Digital Archive (Nova Scotia, Canada).

You can meet our three newest members on the blog, and, if you’re a cultural institution with a photography collection, do consider joining in. We’d love to hear from you, and we’ve written about how Flickr Commons works and what it means to join.

Generally, we are working to make it easier for cultural organizations to use flickr.com to easily reach a global audience of millions, especially smaller institutions. We’re planning to build tools that support joining the Flickr Commons. That includes resources and workflows for onboarding, member management, and engaging the community of volunteer researchers who use, comment and tag Commons photos. Expect these to be rolled out throughout this birthday year and beyond!

Data Lifeboat begins

We’re also starting a major project this year, called Data Lifeboat, and we’ve enlisted three staff from our Commons member institutions to help with user research: Dr Mia Ridge (Digital Curator, British Library), Alan Renga (Digital Archivist, San Diego Air & Space Museum), and Mary Grace Kosta (Congregational Archivist, Sisters of St. Joseph in Canada). Trevor Owens, who heads up Digital Preservation at Library of Congress, is also on the advisory board so that’s a nice virtuous circle right there since LC was the first Flickr Commons partner back in 2008.

We’re hiring!

We’re excited to announce that hiring our first-ever Archivist: https://boards.greenhouse.io/flickrorg/jobs/5614267

It’s a fundamental role at the Flickr Foundation, designed to help us archive ourselves for future team members, and, of course, help think through the challenge of keeping Flickr visible for 100 years.

If you or someone you know has experience in digital archives and/or visual archives, has a creative streak and a desire to work for a young technologically-oriented nonprofit, we’d love you to apply.

Celebrate with us!

Follow us on your social media platform of choice for more birthday festivities:

An unidentified girl is seen in a goat cartAn unidentified girl is seen in a goat cart
Meet our new cohort!

Reopening the doors to Flickr Commons

One of our goals when we started revitalizing Flickr Commons was to bring in new members. We’re so excited for you to meet them. We’re starting small but mighty.

Bringing in new people gives us a chance to spiff up our existing procedures and documentation, test out our onboarding documents, and make new friends. It also places even more precious memories and cultural heritage into a space that has long term plans, with no known copyright restrictions.

Best of all, all of these folks are existing Flickr users so we can share some of what’s special about them with you before our official “relaunch.”

Without further ado, here is our new cohort. Welcome!

Community Archives of Belleville and Hastings County

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/cabhc/

Website: https://www.cabhc.ca/

These community archives, located in Belleville Ontario are comprised of “textual records, photographs, maps, newspapers, and other materials that provide information about the people, places and development of Belleville and Hastings County, Ontario.”

HC02177

This covers the community of about 55,000 people, possibly nicknamed Bellevegas if Wikipedia is to be believed, on the Eastern end of Lake Ontario.

057.

They’ve been posting content to their blog since 2015 including a story of archival survival, a low-tech crowdsourced assessment rolls project, and a tale of reassembling a scrapbook’s pages based on archival material held in three separate archives.

290. B. Party by Otonabee River, Peterborough, 1911

State Archives of North Carolina

Flickr: https://flickr.com/photos/north-carolina-state-archives/
Website: https://archives.ncdcr.gov

The North Carolina State Archives are located in Raleigh, North Carolina. They use their Flickr account to highlight some of the unique and interesting items in their collection. They also interact with the Flickr Community to try to get better information for their unidentified and poorly identified photographs.

PC1929_Phot_B2_F3

Viewing their pictures gives you a great look at both the rural and urban parts of the state. One of my favorite albums is the Carolina Power and Light Photograph Collection, holding images from the photographic library of Carolina Power and Light. The pictures cover 1900 through 1975 give glimpses into random slices of North Carolina.

PhC_248_plate_4

I have a personal soft spot for the Sidney E. Rochelle Photograph Collection a much smaller collection showing motorcycles in and around Durham in the early 1900s. This is where I found the single photograph of Della Crewe on her Harley Davidson motorcycle, with a sign saying “Around the World on a Harley-Davidson.” Intriguing! That image, thanks to its open license, now illustrates her Wikipedia page.

PhC_104_2

The Archives have had a blog since 2007, starting from when the State Library and Archives Building was undergoing renovations. They now have several more. There are a lot of fun stories in there though I am always partial to the odd ones.

PhC_9_4_16_1

Port Morien Digital Archive

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/portmorienarchive/

Port Morien, formerly called Cow Bay, is an historic village located on the rugged east coast of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, Canada. It is now primarily a fishing village, but it is steeped in coal mining history. It is the location of the first commercial coal mine in North America in 1720, as well as the site of the first Boy Scout troop in North America in 1908.

Flint Lighhouse Frank's time

Local history has been well preserved in the community over the years. Historic plaques have been installed, seniors have been interviewed, and there have been a number of audio visual presentations about the community. In addition, numerous books have been written about various aspects of Port Morien history.

Donkin Morien High School BandFair 1992

Keeping with the rich tradition in preserving heritage, a small group of community volunteers have collected approximately 2900 photos of our community of Port Morien. It started as a project that was developed in conjunction with the community homecoming in 2015 called Morien Memories. Photos and short videos include people and places from the past as well as the present. Our mission is to provide a digital visual record of our community for future generations to enjoy.

McIntosh_ Mabel_Caress_Sonny_Dolly_Dawn_StuartHigden_Paulette_Georgie

16. Just A Cool Bell

The Mingun Bell, in this photograph from the Museum of Photographic Arts from 1873, is the only bell in the world to hold the title of “Heaviest functioning bell in the world” three separate times. It weighs ninety tons. Nothing else, just a cool bell.

Mengoon, The Great Bell, said to weigh 90 tons

MOPA has many other classic photographs of bygone eras and the early days of photography.

Painters on the Brooklyn Bridge Suspender Cables-October 7, 1914

Untitled (Snowflake)

Cigar Factory Girls, Tampa, Florida, Jan.

15. Cat Pictures, Mostly

Since the internet is approximately 28% made of cat pictures, we would be remiss if we didn’t mention that Flickr Commons is a great source for quality archival feline photography. That is, photographs of cats, not by cats. Mostly.

In the Rogue's Gallery (LOC)

Camera with kitten

You may be familiar with Brunhilde.

Brünnhilde (LOC)

But did you know about Tige, the Coolidge’s cat in the White House which went missing (and got found)? The Library of Congress has the full story.

How did this cat make the news in 1924? (LOC)

Jessie Tarbox Beals who was the first published female photojournalist in the US, had a soft spot for cats and the Schlesinger Library has an entire album devoted to her photographs of them.

PC60-9-5

Here’s Jennie, a battleship cat.

WWI 140.B1.F2.7

And two other seafaring felines.

Seaman with a cat and kitten, c 1910

And Spark Plug, an airplane cat.

Mascot cat "Spark Plug" [on plane] (LOC)

And Timmie another Coolidge cat with his friend the canary, Caruso.

TIMMONS, MRS. BASCOMB N. (LOC)

Not all Commons cats are canary chums.

38. "Wot Canary?"

All we know about the cat in this photo was that it was “a dysenteric nuisance but certified non-amoebic.”

William Osler, Willliam Francis, H. A. Lafleur, and W. S. Thayer at Johns Hopkins Hospital

This photograph from the early 1900s shows us that cat toys haven’t changed very much. Nor have cats.

Nurse and a cat

It’s the same in Sweden.

Cat. Raivola

These men were Greek immigrants to Australia, working cutting sugar cane. They posed for this photo with their dog, kitten and accordion.

Cane gang at Childers, ca. 1918

15. Cat Pictures, Mostly

Since the internet is approximately 28% made of cat pictures, we would be remiss if we didn’t mention that Flickr Commons is a great source for quality archival feline photography. That is, photographs of cats, not by cats. Mostly.

In the Rogue's Gallery (LOC)

Camera with kitten

You may be familiar with Brunhilde.

Brünnhilde (LOC)

But did you know about Tige, the Coolidge’s cat in the White House which went missing (and got found)? The Library of Congress has the full story.

How did this cat make the news in 1924? (LOC)

Jessie Tarbox Beals who was the first published female photojournalist in the US, had a soft spot for cats and the Schlesinger Library has an entire album devoted to her photographs of them.

PC60-9-5

Here’s Jennie, a battleship cat.

WWI 140.B1.F2.7

And two other seafaring felines.

Seaman with a cat and kitten, c 1910

And Spark Plug, an airplane cat.

Mascot cat "Spark Plug" [on plane] (LOC)

And Timmie another Coolidge cat with his friend the canary, Caruso.

TIMMONS, MRS. BASCOMB N. (LOC)

Not all Commons cats are canary chums.

38. "Wot Canary?"

All we know about the cat in this photo was that it was “a dysenteric nuisance but certified non-amoebic.”

William Osler, Willliam Francis, H. A. Lafleur, and W. S. Thayer at Johns Hopkins Hospital

This photograph from the early 1900s shows us that cat toys haven’t changed very much. Nor have cats.

Nurse and a cat

It’s the same in Sweden.

Cat. Raivola

These men were Greek immigrants to Australia, working cutting sugar cane. They posed for this photo with their dog, kitten and accordion.

Cane gang at Childers, ca. 1918

15. Cat Pictures, Mostly

Since the internet is approximately 28% made of cat pictures, we would be remiss if we didn’t mention that Flickr Commons is a great source for quality archival feline photography. That is, photographs of cats, not by cats. Mostly.

In the Rogue's Gallery (LOC)

Camera with kitten

You may be familiar with Brunhilde.

Brünnhilde (LOC)

But did you know about Tige, the Coolidge’s cat in the White House which went missing (and got found)? The Library of Congress has the full story.

How did this cat make the news in 1924? (LOC)

Jessie Tarbox Beals who was the first published female photojournalist in the US, had a soft spot for cats and the Schlesinger Library has an entire album devoted to her photographs of them.

PC60-9-5

Here’s Jennie, a battleship cat.

WWI 140.B1.F2.7

And two other seafaring felines.

Seaman with a cat and kitten, c 1910

And Spark Plug, an airplane cat.

Mascot cat "Spark Plug" [on plane] (LOC)

And Timmie another Coolidge cat with his friend the canary, Caruso.

TIMMONS, MRS. BASCOMB N. (LOC)

Not all Commons cats are canary chums.

38. "Wot Canary?"

All we know about the cat in this photo was that it was “a dysenteric nuisance but certified non-amoebic.”

William Osler, Willliam Francis, H. A. Lafleur, and W. S. Thayer at Johns Hopkins Hospital

This photograph from the early 1900s shows us that cat toys haven’t changed very much. Nor have cats.

Nurse and a cat

It’s the same in Sweden.

Cat. Raivola

These men were Greek immigrants to Australia, working cutting sugar cane. They posed for this photo with their dog, kitten and accordion.

Cane gang at Childers, ca. 1918

15. Cat Pictures, Mostly

Since the internet is approximately 28% made of cat pictures, we would be remiss if we didn’t mention that Flickr Commons is a great source for quality archival feline photography. That is, photographs of cats, not by cats. Mostly.

In the Rogue's Gallery (LOC)

Camera with kitten

You may be familiar with Brunhilde.

Brünnhilde (LOC)

But did you know about Tige, the Coolidge’s cat in the White House which went missing (and got found)? The Library of Congress has the full story.

How did this cat make the news in 1924? (LOC)

Jessie Tarbox Beals who was the first published female photojournalist in the US, had a soft spot for cats and the Schlesinger Library has an entire album devoted to her photographs of them.

PC60-9-5

Here’s Jennie, a battleship cat.

WWI 140.B1.F2.7

And two other seafaring felines.

Seaman with a cat and kitten, c 1910

And Spark Plug, an airplane cat.

Mascot cat "Spark Plug" [on plane] (LOC)

And Timmie another Coolidge cat with his friend the canary, Caruso.

TIMMONS, MRS. BASCOMB N. (LOC)

Not all Commons cats are canary chums.

38. "Wot Canary?"

All we know about the cat in this photo was that it was “a dysenteric nuisance but certified non-amoebic.”

William Osler, Willliam Francis, H. A. Lafleur, and W. S. Thayer at Johns Hopkins Hospital

This photograph from the early 1900s shows us that cat toys haven’t changed very much. Nor have cats.

Nurse and a cat

It’s the same in Sweden.

Cat. Raivola

These men were Greek immigrants to Australia, working cutting sugar cane. They posed for this photo with their dog, kitten and accordion.

Cane gang at Childers, ca. 1918